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Speakers

Information on the invited speakers will be available as they are confirmed.

Dr. Ulrike Boehm - Janelia Research Campus, Virginia

Dr. Ulrike Boehm Profile

Ulrike is a Physicist, Optical Scientist, and Data Scientist at the Janelia Research Campus in Ashburn, VA. Her work focuses on hardware and software development for biomedical research. She studied Physics at the Technical University in Munich, did her master’s with Wolfgang Baumeister at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried/Munich focusing on correlative cryo-FM/EM, and performed her Ph.D. studies with Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry focusing on the development of novel superresolution microscopy approaches. At the Janelia Research Campus in the US, Ulrike works at the Advanced Imaging Center, which makes advanced imaging technologies developed at Janelia Research Campus available to the scientific community prior to commercialization. Overall, Ulrike has over ten years of experience in designing, building, and running advanced light microscopes, data analysis, and the development of image analysis workflows. Furthermore, she has been highly engaged in community building/engagement, outreach, and teaching activities focusing on women/diversity in science, open science, and microscopy for more than 15 years.

Prof. Garry Duffy - NUI Galway

Prof. Garry Duffy Profile

Garry Duffy is Professor of Anatomy & Regenerative Medicine, within the School of Medicine at the National University of Ireland Galway. He leads the Duffy Lab at NUI Galway, which is focused on developing advanced biomaterials and devices to facilitate targeted delivery and future clinical translation of cell and drug based therapeutics to treat chronic diseases. He leads the DELIVER early stage career programme which gathers industry, academic and clinical partners to train researchers on the design of smart living biomaterial implants to treat Type 1 diabetes. Professor Duffy has a keen interest in developing minimally invasive surgical devices to enable the future translation of biomaterial based cell and drug therapy products. In 2016, he completed a Science Foundation Ireland-funded Academia to Industry Fellowship with Boston Scientific Corporate Research where he developed medical devices for the delivery of biomaterial based therapeutics. He graduated with a PhD in the area of adult stem cell therapeutics for cardiovascular disease in 2008 at the Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI), NUI Galway. Professor Duffy is a two-time Fulbright Scholar. During his first Scholarship in June 2006, he carried out research in cardiovascular tissue engineering and stem cell biology at the Georgia Institute of Technology under the supervision of Prof. Robert M. Nerem. He was awarded his second scholarship while on sabbatical in June 2013 to carry out research in advanced materials for cardiac regeneration at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in collaboration with Prof. Jeffrey Karp. Professor Duffy spent eight years in the Department of Anatomy, RCSI where he joined as a Lecturer in July 2008 and left as Associate Professor in 2016 to take up his current role at NUI Galway. The Duffy Lab researchers have produced over 75 papers in leading journals, and submitted 21 invention disclosures leading to 9 patent applications. He is an academic co-founder of 3 campus companies including www.feeltect.com.

Dr. Caron Jacobs - University of Cape Town, South Africa

Dr. Caron Jacobs Profile

Dr Caron Jacobs is a South African cell biologist and imaging scientist in the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at the University of Cape Town. She is also the co-founder of the African BioImaging Consortium (ABIC) (africanbioimaging.org), a pan-African initiative striving to strengthen the African microscopy community and increase access to bioimaging infrastructure and education across the continent. Caron completed her PhD at University College London in 2018, where she used quantitative super-resolution imaging to study viral-cell infection processes. She returned to South Africa for post-doctoral research developing imaging and analytical tools for spatially-derived omics and mycobacterial research at the University of Cape Town. Caron’s interests in human disease biology, host-pathogen interactions, and the development of specialist microscopy assays to target challenging questions in these fields are complemented by her passion for skills transfer and the elevation of research technologies in settings where they can have the greatest impact. Caron was awarded a Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Imaging Scientist fellowship in 2020, to develop projects working to democratize bioimaging for infectious disease research in Africa. Working with diverse African colleagues, the African BioImaging Consortium (ABIC) was launched in March 2021, and in turn funded by the Chan Zuckerberg initiative as part of their Expanding Access to Global Bioimaging program. ABIC’s efforts focus on facilitating information and resource sharing, and promoting community activities to develop and advocate for growing imaging capacity and expertise across the continent.

Prof. Paul Verkade - University of Bristol, UK

Prof. Paul Verkade Profile

Paul Verkade is a Professor of Bioimaging at the University of Bristol, UK. He has been working in the field of microscopy from the start of his scientific career and over the last 15 years has established himself as one of the leaders in the field of Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM). An early contribution to the field was the development of a high-pressure freezer together with Leica Microsystems (EMPACT2 + RTS) which allowed for cryo-capturing of live light microscopy events within seconds. As a champion of Correlative Microscopy, he has taught on numerous CLEM courses including 4 EMBO practical courses on CLEM in Bristol and edited 5 books on Correlative Microscopy. By collaborating with other groups and developing and applying CLEM technology to a wide variety of biological questions he has published over 30 papers using CLEM

Dr. Jenna L. Cash - University of Edinburgh, UK

Dr. Jenna Cash Profile

I graduated from the University of Edinburgh with a degree in Pharmacology (with Industrial Experience) in 2005. I was then awarded a British Heart Foundation DPhil studentship to identify novel endogenous anti-inflammatory pathways at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford University, with Professor David Greaves. I have many fond memories of my DPhil and found the lab to be a supportive, fun environment to work in. My research resulted in the discovery that a protein, chemerin, undergoes proteolytic processing by activated macrophages to generate peptides with dual anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties. Chemerin-derived peptides are under international patent and undergoing a clinical trial to treat skin inflammation. On completion of my DPhil in 2009, I was awarded the prestigious Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship for 4 years. I divided my time between Professor Mauro Perretti’s lab (William Harvey Research Institute, London), Professor Paul Kubes lab (Calgary University, Canada) and Professor Paul Martins lab (Bristol University). During this period I learnt specialised intravital microscopy techniques and developed a keen interest in wound healing, finding that chemerin peptide C15 can accelerate skin repair with reduced scarring and inhibit neutrophil integrin activation to reduce their recruitment to a site of inflammation.

I was subsequently awarded a 1 year Elizabeth Blackwell Early Career Research Fellowship by Bristol University/Wellcome ISSF, which provided me with the time and funds to pursue setting up my own lab. I was able to establish a clinically relevant mouse model of human chronic wounds and multiphoton imaging of skin repair processes in the mouse. I ultimately secured a Chancellors Fellowship (University of Edinburgh) and a Sir Henry Dale Fellowship from the Wellcome Trust/Royal Society to establish my lab within the Centre for Inflammation Research at the University of Edinburgh in August 2016.

The Cash lab is located in the Centre for Inflammation Research in the Queen’s Medical Research Institute at Edinburgh University. Established in 2016, we use mouse and human models to understand the mechanisms that govern whether a skin wound will heal acutely or develop into a chronic non-healing wound. We employ next generation sequencing, digital spatial profiling, histology, multiphoton imaging, OCT, lipidomics and flow cytometry to understand the steps involved in skin healing versus repair failure. We particularly focus on the response of immune cells, including macrophages, neutrophils and mast cells, to skin injury in our preclinical mouse models and human wound biopsies. We are also exploring whether pro-resolving pathways can be harnessed to drive healing, including rescue of chronic wounds. The overarching goal of our translational, multi-disciplinary program is to develop novel therapeutic strategies to promote skin healing.

Dr. Jonathan Taylor - Glasgow University, Scotland

Dr. Jonathan Taylor Profile

I am a senior lecturer in Physics at Glasgow University, having previously studied at Oxford and Durham universities and continued with postdoc work at Durham. Here in Glagow my research group develops novel optical microscopy techniques, with a particular interest in the intersection of light sheet microscopy, computational imaging, and in vivo biology. We work closely with both biological researchers and microscope manufacturers to get our technologies into biomedical research labs. Our recent achievements have included:

  • Maintaining day-long heartbeat-synchronization in the zebrafish heart, providing new insights into cardiac development.
  • Contact-free hydrodynamic manipulation of multiple micro-particles with the help of optically actuated micro-rotors.
  • Reconstructing a complete 3D volume image of a microscope sample from 2D projection imaging techniques.
Some of the research questions and challenges I am currently interested in are:
  • Can our imaging and flow measurement tools help unravel the biomechanical coupling between heart structure, flow and electrophysiology?
  • How can we best exploit the relationship between information, measurements and imaging?
  • How can we rethink the imaging & analysis pipeline, improving it by building in knowledge of physical models and expectation at an early stage?

Dr. Anna Sartori-Rupp - Institut Pasteur, France

Dr. Anna Sartori-Rupp Profile

Anna is a Physicist with a strong passion for Imaging and Microscopy. After obtaining a degree in Physics at the University of Padua, Italy, and a PhD in Physics at Imperial College, London, UK, she turned towards the world of Microscopy in Life Science. She was granted a Postdoctoral Marie Curie Individual Fellowship at Institut Curie, Paris, where she focused on fluorescent videomicroscopy to model DNA migration in polymeric matrices. Then, she moved on for a second PostDoc in the cryo-EM renowned lab of Prof. W. Baumeister at the MPI of Biochemistry in Munich, where she established a novel technique, the correlation between fluorescent microscopy in cryogenic conditions and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-CLEM).

Since 2007, she works at the UBI platform as an expert of 3D cryo-electron microscopy. She coordinates collaborative scientific projects involving high resolution cryo-tomography and cryo-CLEM applied to the study of host-pathogen interaction, starting from sample preparation to data collection and analysis. In one of her latest research works in collaboration with the group of Prof. C. Zurzolo at Institut Pasteur, she conceived a novel cryo-CLEM approach that uncovered for the first time the striking actin’ structural organization of Tunneling Nanotubes in neuronal cells.

Dr. Raymond McQuaid - Queen's University Belfast

Dr. Raymond McQuaid Profile

Dr Raymond McQuaid is a UKRI Future Leaders Fellow in the School of Mathematics and Physics in Queen’s University Belfast. During his PhD and post-doctoral years, he developed novel Focused Ion Beam microscopy approaches for fabricating nanostructured single-crystal ferroelectric devices and characterised the physics of domains and domain walls in these using functional atomic force microscopy techniques. In 2018, he was awarded a Japan Trust International Research Cooperation Program Fellowship for a stay of research at Fujitsu Laboratories Japan, where his expertise in ferroelectrics was leveraged as part of their Next Generation Materials Project. His current research focuses on the thermal properties of ferroic domain walls and is supported by a UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship award (~£950k) to setup his own dedicated laboratory and research group at Queen’s. A significant part of this activity involves use and development of Scanning Thermal Microscopy, an atomic force microscopy technique that enables nanoscale spatially resolved temperature mapping. His work has been published in high-impact journals such as Nano Letters, Nature Communications, and Advanced Materials. He has also served on the organising committees for flagship conferences in the ferroelectrics community in recent years, such as ISIF 2019 and the upcoming ISAF-ECAPD-PFM 2022.

Dr. David Barry - Francis Crick Institute

Dr. David Barry Profile

Dave is a bioimage analyst with over 15 years’ experience of developing algorithms and open-source software in life science research. After completing his undergraduate studies in Electronic Engineering at University College Dublin (2004), Dave did his PhD at the Dublin Institute of Technology (now TU Dublin) with Dr Gwilym Williams, using image analysis to relate the morphology of filamentous microbes to their metabolite yield in fermentations (2010). He then spent six years as a post-doc in the lab of Dr Michael Way at the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute (which became part of the Francis Crick Institute in 2015), where he used live cell imaging and developed software to analyse cellular and sub-cellular processes. Since 2017, Dave has worked as a dedicated image analyst at the Francis Crick Institute and is now Deputy Head of the Crick Advanced Light Microscopy Science Technology Platform.

Important Dates

  • 2022 Symposium
    April 6th-8th
  • Abstract Submission
    16th March